Reporters at War: Bringing It All Back Home (EMMY AWARD WINNING)

Reporters At War is a three-part series that takes a long hard look at one of the most dramatic and dangerous careers of modern times, that of the war correspondent.

More than 300 journalists have been killed in battle zones in the last dozen years, some 200 of these having been deliberately targeted by their killers.

The War in Iraq’s rate of attrition is the highest ever. Though 63 died in the Vietnam between 1963-1975, it’s been estimated that at the above rate around 4,500 journalists would die if the Iraq conflict lasted as long as the Vietnam War. Then there’s the psychological trauma of witnessing the brutality of war close-up, constantly, day in, day out, over long agonising periods of time. No wonder nervous breakdowns, marital break-ups, alcoholism, etc affect war correspondents to a degree unexperienced by most ordinary folk.

Reporters At War also examines the ever-changing circumstances that the war correspondent must file their stories under and the evolving technology that is supposed to make their job easier…that, at least, is the theory. It also looks at some early examples of how technology aided and abetted the faking of war newsreel footage, the impact that television may have had on the outcome of war and the pressure that reporters now find themselves under in the satellite-driven, 24-hour rolling-news era that they now unwittingly find themselves starring in.

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